Revolutionary War References to Pequannock and Pompton Plains

From: Diary of a Common Soldier in the American Revolution 1775-1787. Annotated Edition of the Military Journal of Jeremiah Greenman. Edited by C. Bray and Paul E. Bushnell. Northern Illinois University Press, De KaIb, Illinois, 1978. (H. 973.3).
 

April 1777 in Providence....
W 23. this morn from ye Iron works came to ringwood ware we mad a small halt  then came to wanacke ware we dined / then to pumton / very good going / lodged in pequamet in a barn / thick weather & cold for this time of year & so forth / two dollars.

T 24. this morn from pequanet / very cold & raining weather. / cam to bonetown ware we made a small halt / then came to morristown / the town being fool [full] of troops we went about 3 milds out of town....
 

June-July 1777 on a March....
T 3. this morn from morristown came to Cituate ware we eat breakfast / then proceeded on as far as pumton ware we put up / had orders to be in readyness for to march in ye morn at 2 oClock.

F. 4. this morn very early marcht from pumton. / marcht far as a yapor [?] ware we halted a little while. / then came to the Clove or Quantrom ware we pitched our tent / draw'd sum provision & cooked it / then struck our tents jist at night. / came as far as Kearkreart ware we put up being fatiagued very bad / 2 men draped dead with heat wen marching....
 

October 1777....
T 2. this morning came to the Clove where we made a halt, then come to Pumton where we halted.
 

F 3. this morning from pumton came to pequamet where we made a halt to execute but he made his Escape from the Guard, from hear set ouy / Came to Morristown where we drawed Provision....

October 1781 G. End....
T 25. this Morning all the Officers belonging to the Northward hired three Waggons to transport our Selvs and bagage to the North River, - took leave of our fellow prisoners, and proceded to Newark, to Cob. Wards (a late prisoner) where breakfasted. from where proceeded to Cranistown twelve Miles from Elisebeth Town, here made a Small Halt to refresh Our Selvs and horses -then pushed on 24 miles to Pumton where put up at Mr. Deboes.

F 26. this Morning raining & Stormy, from Pumton came to New Entrum 12 miles from Pumton where made a halt on account of the Storm, and hear the Most Glorious News. Confirmed of Conwallleses being taken by our Illustris Commander in Chief and the French army-....

June, 1782 On a March....
W 5. This morning the Genl. beat at 5, oClock / at half after 5 the assembly when the March commenced from the right / Came as far as Troy where made a small halt and breakfast'd / then counter marched and came to Pequaneck whare halted 'till half after 4 when came 2 Miles & incamped / had a very Severe Squall of rain & wind.

T 6. This Morning drawed Provision from the New York Lines Contractor then proceeded on our March to Pumpton Plains where made a small halt / very warm, a Number of Men fainted & fell in rear that could not keep up. Come to Pumpton whare continued. 4 hours. then proceeded on our March to the Ponds Meatinghoi[u]se, whare incamped - myself having Command of the rear Guard plased out a Sergt. with a Guard. as it was thought Dangerous at this place....

From: The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources 1745-Prepared under the direction of the United States George Washington Bicentennial Commission and published by authority of Congress. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor. Volume 8 May 1, 1777-July 31, 1777. United States Government Printing Office, Washington.

To THE PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS
Vanaulens, 8 Miles from Pumpton Plains.
July14, 1777.

Sir:  I am arrived here this afternoon with the Army. after a very fatiguing March. owning to the Roads which which have becom extremely deep and miry from the late Rains. I intend to proceed in the Morning towards the North River, if the Weather permits; At present it is cloudy and heavy and there is an Appearance of more Rain.
     By the Express, who will deliver this, I just now reced. a Letter rom Genl. Schuyler. advising for the first time, that General St. Clair is not in the Hands of the Enemy. As the Express has a large Packet for Congress from General Schuyler, I presume they will be informed of all the Intelligence he was possessed of respecting our Affairs in his department, and therefore I shall not trouble them with a Copy of his Letter to myself upon the Subject. I should be happy if they had a more agreeable aspect than they seem to have. I am & ca. 84 [ 84 In the writing of Robert Hanson Harrison.]